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39th Annual National Cowgirl Hall of Fame Inductions

Five Cowgirls to Receive Honors at the 39th Annual National Cowgirl Hall of Fame Inductions
Ceremony to be held Oct. 23 at the Will Rogers Memorial Center in Fort Worth, Texas

FORT WORTH, TEXAS (July 16, 2014) – The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame – the only museum in the world dedicated to honoring women of the American West who have displayed extraordinary courage in their trailblazing efforts – is pleased to announce the 2014 National Cowgirl Hall of Fame Inductees, who will be honored in the 39th annual induction ceremony on Thursday, Oct. 23, at the Will Rogers Memorial Center Round Up Inn in Fort Worth, Texas. This year’s class includes a sister-duo known for their award-winning Chuckwagon cooking; a nationally-known trick rider and cattlewoman; a celebrated Fort Worth pathologist; and a Hollywood Western screenwriter. 

The 2014 inductees are:

  • Jean Cates and Sue Cunningham: Tasty traditions have always been served up in Jean Cates and Sue Cunningham’s family.  Born in Turkey, Texas, the sisters learned what it meant to be real cowboy cooks thanks to their father. They began the C-Bar-C Chuckwagon and made history in 1992 when they walked away with the winnings at the Western Heritage Classic Cook-off in Abilene, Texas, as the first women team to claim the top honor. In 1996, they were awarded the American Cowboy Culture Award presented by the National Cowboy Symposium and Celebration. They were also named Chuckwagon of the Year by the Academy of Western Artists.

  • Shirley Lucas Jauregui: Shirley Lucas Jauregui dreamed of owning and riding a horse while growing up on the edge of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Jauregui and her sister, Sharon, landed their first trick riding appearance at the 1948 Lakeside Rodeo followed by the Sheriff’s Rodeo at the Los Angeles Coliseum. The sister act juggled their nationally-known act, performing at the National Western Stock Show in Denver, the Cow Palace, and Albuquerque, with movie contract work, doubling for movie industry names such as Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Shirley Jones, Betty Hutton, Grace Kelly, just to name a few. They also had their hand in designing the latest western fashions for women by working with brands such as Wrangler. Jauregui was named California’s Cattlewoman of the Year in 1996, and received the Tad Lucas Memorial Award from the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in 2008.

  • May Owen, M.D. (1891-1988): Dr. May Owen committed to a career in medicine at the age of nine when she discovered her true passion was helping others. Her first patients were animals on her family’s farm in Falls County, Texas. While she attended high school in Fort Worth, Texas, she remained committed to helping her father on the farm every weekend and still graduated at the top of her class. The first woman to enroll in Louisville Medical College in Kentucky, she earned her medical degree in 1921, and continued studies at Mayo Clinic and Bellevue Hospital in New York City. Owen contributed to the world of veterinary medicine by assisting with the development of a rabies vaccine and the discovery of diabetes in sheep when fed molasses cake. Her greatest contribution to the field of pathology was discovering the danger of surgical glove powder.

  • Frances Kavanaugh Hecker (1915-2009): Known as the “Cowgirl of the Typewriter,” Frances Kavanaugh Hecker was one of the few women writing western screenplays in Hollywood, a primarily male-dominated profession. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up around ranching in Houston which gave her what she called “the feeling of Westerns.” Her credits began with the Driftin’ Kid in 1941, and over the next ten years, worked on over 30 films starring the likes of Tom Keene, Lash LaRue, Eddie Dean, Ken Maynard, Bob Steele, and Hoot Gibson.

The National Cowgirl Hall of Fame selection process is rigorous and lengthy. Out of a competitive list, which consistently grows with each new nomination, only four or five successful candidates per calendar year are honored with the prestigious distinction of becoming a National Cowgirl Hall of Fame Inductee. The Hall of Fame is grouped in to five categories: artists and writers, champions and competitive performers, entertainers, ranchers (stewards of land and livestock), or trailblazers and pioneers. Since 1975, 215 women have been inducted.
“We are pleased with the selection of this year’s inductees, and welcome them to the Hall of Fame family.” said Patricia Riley, Executive Director, National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame. “Each brings a unique cowgirl story to the Hall of Fame that will be preserved for generations to come.”
The Induction luncheon and ceremony is the largest event for the Hall of Fame, and draws approximately 700-1,000 attendees each year. The event will kick off at 10:00 a.m. with the opening of holiday shopping vendor booths and a champagne reception followed by the Induction luncheon and ceremony. For ticket information, please contact Emmy Lou Prescott at emmylou@cowgirl.net or call 817-509-8965.  
For more news about the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame, visit www.cowgirl.net

About the National Cowgirl Museum & Hall of Fame
The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame honors and celebrates women, past and present, whose lives exemplify the courage, resilience, and independence that helped shape the American West, and fosters an appreciation of the ideals and spirit of self-reliance they inspire. The Hall of Fame’s purpose is twofold: to preserve the history and impact of western women living from the mid-1800s to present day, and to foster an appreciation for their ideals and spirit of self-reliance. These women are the legacy of legends — artists and writers, champions and competitive performers, entertainers, ranchers (stewards of land and livestock), trailblazers and pioneers. The Museum is considered an invaluable national educational resource for its exhibits, research library, rare photograph collection, and award-winning distance-learning programs for grades K-12 and adults.

Located at 1720 Gendy Street, Fort Worth, Texas 76107, the Cowgirl is open Monday (Memorial Day to Labor Day) from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is $8 for children ages 3 to 12 and senior citizens (60+) and $10 for adults (ages 13+). For more information, please visit www.cowgirl.net or call 817-476-FAME (3263).

Blake Shelton First Headliner for 2015 Kicker Country Stampede Festival




Blake Shelton Announced as First Headliner for 2015
Kicker Country Stampede Festival Set for June 25–28, 2015


Luke Bryan, Chris Young, Lee Brice & More Bring Country
Stampede to CMT Hot 20 Countdown on July 12

 
MANHATTAN, KS (July 11, 2014) – Thousands of country music fans flocked to Tuttle Creek State Park in Manhattan, Kansas, and soaked in performances by some of today’s hottest country music stars, including Luke Bryan, Eric Church and more, at Kicker Country Stampede 2014. If you missed the action this year, tune into CMT Hot 20 Countdown on July 12 (11:00am ET/PT on CMT) to catch the highlights and see interviews with and performances by Stampede artists Luke Bryan, Chris Young, Lee Brice, Thomas Rhett and more.

Country megastar and judge on NBC’s The Voice Blake Shelton will be one of the headliners for Kicker Country Stampede 2015. Stay tuned for even more exciting artist announcements in the coming months! Early-bird, weekend, VIP and Reserved tickets are currently on sale, along with 700 reserved camping spots, for June 25–28, 2015. VIP tickets are available for $490, four-day GA passes for $120, four-day, jump-the-line passes for $130, reserved seats for $250, reserved camping sites for $175 and all other camping is available starting at $135 until Nov. 30. For more information on tickets or for any of your Kicker Country Stampede needs, visit www.countrystampede.com

Kicker Country Stampede offered a full-fan experience in 2014 with fun for attendees of any age. In addition to the main stage boasting the biggest names in country music, Steel Rodeo Tours provided non-stop, action packed freestyle motocross exhibitions. The Nashville Songwriters Association International Songwriters Tent featured established, as well as up-and-coming songwriters, including Lance Carpenter, Rob Northcutt Band, Tony Ramey and more. Kite's Grille & Bar Tuttleville Stage once again showcased the best local talent the Midwest has to offer, including Tim Zach & The Whiskey Bent, County Road 5, Jared Daniels Band and more. Other activities included a carnival, mouth-watering vendor food, shopping, interactive exhibits and much, much more.

Unique Equine Art


















Artist Babis created this sculpture named ‘hedonism(y) trojaner’ out of resin and recycled computer buttons. 







 All images ©  Babis Pangiotidis



Driftwood Horse Sculptures by Heather Jansch




























Driftwood Horse Sculptures by A horse chandelier made out of Swarvski crystals by Stella McCartney

































Junkyard Horse sculptures by Doug Owens


Cowgirl Tank Tops


Here our seven of our favorite cute and stylish cowgirl tank tops!
ranging from $18-$45





Be Grateful tank top by Original Cowgirl Clothing Co. $36
Cowgirl tank top by CouthClothing $18

Take a little ride with you tank top by TumbleRoot $26.95

Dang Cowgirl tank top by Dang Chicks $32

It's all about the South tank top by ATX Mafia $40

Rock & Roll Cowgirl Turquoise and Ombre Aztec tank top $45
The Grooming Tree tank top by Tara Kiwi $39.50 $23.70

3 Ways to Wear: Amber Boots by Lane Boots



Featured this time in our 3 Ways to Wear are the stunning Amber Boots by Lane Boots




Dallas



Black velvet pants
amazon.co.uk



Shoulder strap purse
nastygal.com


R J Graziano triple strand necklace
theshoppingchannel.com


R J Graziano clear jewelry
theshoppingchannel.com

Cowgirl


Pink shirt
maurices.com


Denim jeans
bulletbluesca.com


Cowboy boots
amazon.com


Mixit brown earrings
jcpenney.com

Casual Cowgirl


Chiffon dress
stylishplus.com


Western boots
amazon.com


Crossbody purse
delias.com


Chain necklace
modcloth.com

Father's Day Gift Guide


by Cassidy Magazine Staff

Father's day is fast approaching, so we put together a little survey of the men in our lives and here are some of the top things on their Father's Day wish lists.


Ebbets Field Flannels® for J.Crew Retro Baseball Caps are made in the USA and are of the highest quality, personally one of my favorite accessories and are heirloom quality. 
They are priced around $50 and can be found HERE


Can't go wrong with a nice new pair of boots, online retailer Country Habit has a great selection with prices ranging between $149-$680. Check out their complete selection HERE


Awesome jeans are always on every guys list, and Bullet Blues makes some of the best classic mens blue jeans in the world. The best part is that they are made right here in the USA. They do run $169-$175 a pair but the quality speaks for itself. Order online HERE


Your guy can't wear boots all of the time and when he decides to take a drive down a country road in his classic car these  classic Driving shoes are the perfect choice. The price range is from $125-$250 and are online at the Maserati Store HERE


Stetson has launched a great collection of cowboy hats including some of its classic styles starting as low as $27.00, plus they have a great selection fashion hats as well. Click HERE to shop Stetson.


Guys love Steve McQueen, Cars, and just about anything that goes fast. Morgan's & Phillip's captures retro American style and features officially licensed designs from Shelby American and Gulf Oil. Prices starting at $40 get them HERE




Tsovet is a cool California brand, the watches offer premium quality, construction, and feel, but without break the bank prices.Pricing ranges from as low as $175 and as high as $4,200 for select limited editions. Shop HERE



Every man needs a nice weekend bag, and Canvas Bag Machine makes some of the best. Each bag is made by hand in the USA, if you want to get creative you can even order a custom color combination to match one of dads favorite cars. For $248 the summit is a great value and you can order it HERE

How to Fit a Saddle

by Tammy Patterson

Styles of saddle:

Dressage Saddles - Most offer a closer fit to the horse, maximising contact between horse and rider. Knee rolls and saddle flap length are often longer, helping to create a longer, more effective leg position. The pommel and cantle are often a little higher giving non restrictive security and support when in the seat and excellent centre of balance for the rider.

Jumping Saddles - Aims to give the rider extra grip and closeness. The saddle flaps and knee rolls are positioned further forward to accommodate for the more acute knee angle of the rider, providing better grip at the knee. The pommel and cantle are not raised high, enabling the rider to move in and out of jumping positions easily and without restriction.

General Purpose / All Purpose Saddles - A widely used, versatile saddle. The cut of the saddle flaps and the height of the pommel and cantle allow for use in dressage, cross country and show jumping.

Western Saddles -The most widely used in the North America and growing with popularity in Europe and the rest of the world as more people embraces the American Western lifestyle. Developed from working saddles the Western Saddle still retains many of its rugged working features like the horn.

Fitting saddles:

Fitting saddles requires a lot of skill and should be done by qualified saddle fitters. There are a few points that can be observed and monitored by you to ensure the saddle is not uncomfortable for your horse.
Saddle size is determined by measuring from either side of the pommel (at the front of the skirt), to the middle of the cantle in a straight line. When sitting in the saddle the rider should be able to place 4 fingers between themselves and the cantle.

The saddle,
• Should not place any pressure on the spine, too wide or too narrow can cause pain and damage or bruise the spine or muscles running along the horses back.
• Should not sit any further back than the 18th rib. Past this point there is soft and sensitive tissue that, if pressure is put on them, can cause discomfort.
• Should sit clear of the horse's shoulder blade allowing for freedom of movement and preventing any pinching, bruising, soreness or loss of blood circulation to the Trapezius muscle.
• Should spread the weight of the rider evenly across the horses back. This will help to prevent pressure points from occurring.
• Should clear the horse's spine by 4 cm between pommel and withers (without a numnah) when the rider is on the horse.
Saddles, their fit to your horse and their fit to you should be checked twice yearly or more so if competing. This will accommodate for any changes that have arisen in your horse or saddle due to weight loss or muscle tone, work load or type of work done.
It is important to be aware of the factors that affect the fit of your saddle:
• Ensuring you sit squarely in the saddle will help to prevent the saddle from becoming unevenly balanced.
• Mounting from the ground continuously on the same side can, over time, pull the saddle out of the correct shape and put strain on the muscles of the horses back.
• Both stirrup lengths should be the same, otherwise this contributes to uneven rider weight distribution.
• Correct cleaning and maintenance of your saddle will keep it supple, allowing it to adapt to the horses shape fully, reducing pressure points.
• Correctly sized numnahs and the use of them will prevent the saddle from cracking due to dirt and sweat from the horse.
• Changes in weight and size of the rider or horse however subtle can affect the fit and comfort of the saddle on the horses back.
• Changes in frequency, type and level of work that the horse is undergoing can alter the fit of the saddle.
It is easy to spot signs that your horse is uncomfortable under the saddle if you know what to look for,
• Bucking.
• Reluctancy to go forward, jump etc.
• Reacting negatively at the sight of the saddle or when you go to put the saddle on their back.
• Their back dipping as you mount or sit your weight on the saddle.
• Unevenness /changes in their stride or changes in their movement on certain reins.


About the Author:

Tammy is an avid rider who likes to promote the proper ways to be looking after horses. Tammy works part time for Anything Equine online retailer in the UK who specialise in equestrian saddles as well as horse riding gloves in the UK.